Multiple Offender Crimes & Criminal Flash Mobs

How to thwart a criminal flash mob

Flash mobs -- groups that arrange to meet in a certain place at a prearranged time -- often aim to do nothing more than amuse the crowd and dance together for a YouTube video, but a growing number of criminal flash mobs are meeting up to wreck stores and steal merchandise, often injuring people in their wake, writes NRF's Joe LaRocca. NRF has issued new guidelines for retailers looking to protect themselves against flash mobs. Learn more.

Caught on tape: Surveillance shows criminal flash mob looting D.C.-area store
An associate working the night shift at a D.C.-area 7-Eleven was rendered helpless as dozens of youths rushed the store and stole merchandise around 2 a.m. on Saturday. Video of the incident shows many of the offenders smiling and laughing before walking out of the store without paying. More...

Additional Resources:

NRF's Multiple Offender Crime white paper
Multiple offender crimes aren’t your typical so-called “flash mob”. Traditionally, these multiple offender crime groups engage in grab-and-run scenarios where offenders quickly enter stores and target specific merchandise – such as high-end handbags, jewelry and designer clothing – then flee, sometimes to a waiting vehicle or, as was the case in several high profile incidents, using mass transit. More...

NRF's Crowd Management Guidelines
In anticipation of Black Friday and other events that bring large crowds during the holiday season, NRF has released its 2011 Crowd Management Guidelines. These guidelines, created in collaboration with retail loss prevention executives, examine both the expected and unexpected factors in managing large crowds. More...

Civil Disturbance
Large crowds descend for many reasons – planned and unplanned events, however some converge for protests or rallies such as the Occupy Wall Street or World Bank/IMF protests. Items to consider in a crowd management policy regarding civil disturbances are located here. More...